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Cyberpunk
This nOde last updated October 10th, 2004 and is permanently morphing...
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cyberpunk

cyberpunk (sì'ber-punk`) noun
1. A genre of near-future science fiction in which conflict and action take place in internal linkvirtual reality environments maintained on global computer internal linknetworks in a worldwide culture of dystopian internal linkalienation. The prototypical cyberpunk novel is William Gibson's _Neuromancer_ (1982).
2. A category of popular culture that resembles the ethos of cyberpunk fiction.
3. A person or fictional character who resembles the heroes of cyberpunk fiction.



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Title of a short story by Bruce Bethke, later used by Gardner Dozoi, editor of _Asimov_ magazine.  Shortlived eighties subculture spawned by internal linkWilliam Gibson'sinternal linksci-fi big bang internal link_Neuromancer_ atomjacked inventory cache  and internal linkRidley Scott's visionary film internal link_Blade Runner_ (vhs/ntsc)atomjacked inventory cache (1982)
 

William Gibson Neuromancer Blade Runner - Tyrell Corporation


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"internal linkStanley Kubrick is the essence of cyberpunk."    - internal linkTimothy Leary 

Stanley Kubrick


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In the late 50's and 60's, a group of a hundred or so select psychologists and philosophers discovered the brain.  That is, they discovered how to navigate and explore the brain, just like Magellan and Columbus did for the outer geography of the planet earth.  People like internal linkAldous Huxleyinternal linkAlan Watts, and internal linkAlbert Hofmann used psyche-active vehicles to move around in the brain.  One of the major philosophic tasks of the late twentieth century is mapping the different islands or hemispheres or continents in the universe of the brain.

Aldoux Huxley Alan Watts Albert Hofmann Timothy Leary's finger

I remember Huxley used the metaphor of the fire antipodes of the brain, of the mind -- like internal linkAustralia being discovered by Captain Cook.   This is the first task of the psychedelic philosopher.  So over the years I've produced dozens of sketch maps of the culvas circles, the circuits or the levels of consciousness.  These were crude words to build up a vocabulary or a internal linkcartography of inner space.  I don't use the notion of internal linkeight circuits now as much as I did, but that's why i did it.

The twenty-first century person is a internal linkcybernetic person.  He or she accepts the Heisenberg principle that you create all internal linkrealities.  Therefore you're responsible for everything that you experience.  This identification of yourself as a internal linkquantum entity certainly dissolves most of the identification chords to your former culture, your former nation, your former religion, or any other external structure, even to your family, unless family members are redefined as cybernetic entities.  The cyber-internal linkpunk, or the cybernetic person, is a free agent.  By the way, nobody uses that term anymore; it's like one of those words taht was wonderful for awhile, then it carried all the freight it could, and it was kind of co-opted by some high-falutin literay types and so forth.  But no one uses that word anymore, although we certainly hang it up on the trophy shelf as a wonderful bumper sticker.

The cybernetic person spends a very high percentage of his or her time and energy in what's now called cyber-space, communicating, mutually creating new realities with other people, on the other side of the screen.  The cyber-punk person is a free agent, and the new society is made up of free agents who link-up at a much different level of social connection than family, work, or religious commitment.  So the cyber-society is a society of highly skilled, highly courageous, cybernetic people who mutually create what we call "internal linkcyberias" or cyber-architectures, on the other side of the screen.

internal linkTimothy Leary



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internal linkScience Fiction is the literature of internal linkalienation.  I'm really influenced by internal linkPhillip K. Dick, Samuel Delaney, and also a lot of the Cyberpunk guys, Bruce Sterling, John Shirley, internal linkWilliam Gibson, Pat Cadigan.  Another writer, Octavia Butler, uses genetic mutation as a metaphor for what's going on in society, psychologically, emotionally, and economically.  It's all being determined by genetic type in her books.

internal linkDJ Spooky 

Philip K. Dick DJ Spooky


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THE CYBERPUNK AS MODERN ALCHEMIST

The baby boom generation has grown up in an electronic world of TV and personal computing screens.The cyberpunks offer metaphors, rituals, life styles for dealing with the universe of internal linkinformation. More and more of us are becoming electro-internal linkshamans, modern internal linkalchemists.
Alchemy digital trance formation...

Alchemists of the Middle Ages described the construction of magical appliances for viewing future events, or speaking to friends distant or dead. Writings of Paracelsus describe a mirror of ELECTRUM MAGICUM with telegenic properties, and crystal scrying was in its heyday.

Today, internal linkdigital alchemists have at their command tools of a precision and power unimagined by their  predecessors. Computer screens ARE magical mirrors, presenting alternate internal linkrealities at varying degrees of abstraction on command (invocation). internal linkAleister Crowley defined internal linkmagick as 'the art and science of causing change to occur in conformity with our will,' and to this end the computer is the universal level of Archimedes.

The parallels between the culture of the alchemists and that of cyberpunk computer adepts are inescapable. Both employ knowledge of an occult arcanum unknown to the population at large, with secret symbols and words of power. The 'secret symbols' comprise the internal linklanguages of computers and mathematics, and the 'words of power' instruct computer operating systems to complete Herculean tasks. Knowing the precise code name of a digital program permits it to be conjured into existence, transcending the labor of muscular or mechanical search or manufacture.

Rites of initiation or apprenticeship are common to both. 'internal linkPsychic feats' of telepathy and action-at-a-distance are achieved by selection of the menu option.

- Erik Davis



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Atari Teenage Riot - Delete Yourself!


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Cyberpunk began as a loose generational internal linknexus of writers swapping letters,  manuscripts, ideas.

[...]

Cyberpunk crunches together neuro- and physical chemistry, genetic biology,  structural linguistics, internal linkcybernetics, bio-technology and cyborg engineering into a  fantastic series of fictions.

[...]

There is no typical cyberpunk, although the general project does have central  themes, tenets, and topics. I'd say it is an eighties milieu - nineties, post-internal link2001 would  equally do - it is a product of the interzone between hard technologies/sciences and  nihilo-romanticist internal linksurrealism. Its precursors are Michael Moorcock, Langdon Jones,  Harlan Ellison,  Samuel Delaney, Norman Spinrad, Brian Aldiss, John Varley, internal linkPhilip. K. Dick, Alfred Bester,  the strange internal linkpulsing entropies of internal linkThomas Pynchon,  the
panic-theory of internal linkBaudrillard, the Situationist International,  Larry Niven, Roger  Zelazney, internal linkH.G. Wells,  the "programming phenomena" control-data buzz of Guy  Debord,  and the seminal genius of J.G. Ballard.
Jean Baudrillard

[...]

Cyberpunk was essentially initiated by J.G.Ballard in The Atrocity Exhibition.  Ballard details the collapse of a landscape through which lines of deterritorialisation  have proceeded to absolute tolerances, internal linkfractal zones in which sheer contiguity replaces syntax...

[...]

Thomas Pynchon in internal link_Gravity's Rainbow_ explores the obliteration of outdated  territories, internal linklanguages, affiliations, of any boundaries or forms that have impeded the installation of cybernetics--the theory of messages and their control is here  intermeshed with the hegemony of what Pynchon calls the mega-cartel, the  zaibatsu, the multinationals.

[...]

Cyberpunk has a strong garage-band aesthetic. It grapples with the raw core of  the near future--its myths, its ideas, its coming practices. It is a pop culture which is  theorizing itself into a more cohesive and self-determined existence.

[...]

Roy's murder of Tyrell is the most meaningful statement in the whole of Cyberpunk : "Not an easy thing, to meet your maker."

[...]

Cyberpunk is a pop-cultural fascination with cybernetic systems, including a  vast array of machines and apparatuses that exhibit
computational power. Such  systems contain a dynamic, even if wasted, quotient of intelligence. internal linkTelephone  networks,  communication satellites, radar systems, programmable laser video-discs,  robots, biogenetically engineered cells, rocket guidance systems, videotex internal linknetworks--all exhibit a capacity to process internal linkinformation and execute actions. They are  all cybernetic in that they are self-regulating mechanisms or systems within predefined limits and in relation to predefined tasks.
the Network Information in formation

[...]

There are no truly entropic or closed systems in Cyberpunk as there are in  Situationist theory; all internal linkprocesses impinge upon and are effected by other processes  in some way. Systems feed energy into each other. Feedback exists between systems  that are not in themselves closed but contingent upon other systems. A system is closed when entropy, internal linkvirtual technologies, the Videodrome, gas or internal linkelectricity bills dominate the internal linkfeedback process, that is when the measure of energy lost is greater than the measure of energy gained. A candle is a good example.
 

generators.jpg feedback

[...]

There is no more opposition in the Cyberpunk territory between the abstractions of money and the apparent materiality of  commodities; money and what it can buy are now fundamentally of the same substance.

[...]

Cyberpunk makes clear that information is a name for the content of what is exchanged with the outer world as we adjust to it and make our adjustments felt  upon it-to live effectively is to live with adequate information, the fictions of Cyberpunk.

[...]

Cyberspace as described by internal linkWilliam Gibson in internal link_Neuromancer_ was prefigured in internal linkNikola Tesla's 1901 plan for a world system of totally interconnected, planetary  communications. He believed he could engineer a globe unified by the universal regulation of internal linktime and fully traversed by internal linkflows of internal linklanguage, images, and money-all reduced to an undifferentiated internal linkflux of electrical energy.
Nikola Tesla

[...]

Situationist Cyberpunk flicks aside the general form of Marxist analysis... and suggests that the classical definition of productive internal linkforces is too restrictive and expands the analysis further into the whole murky field of significations,  transmissions, communications, materialisations, reifications- programming  phenomena.

[...]
One of the key roles of the expanding electronic grid is to articulate a new social  and geopolitical stratification based on immediacy of access to data. The aim of  Cyberpunk is to create a state of temporary gridlock in order to insert certain secrets  of its own.

excerpts from article on cyberpunk by  Mark Downham on which appeared in London's _VAGUE_ magazine .


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Cyberpunk (from internal linkCyber(netics) + internal linkpunk) is a sub-genre of internal linkscience fiction which uses elements from the hard-boiled detective novel, film noir, internal linkJapanese anime, and post-modernist prose. It describes the nihilistic, underground side of the internal linkdigital society which started to internal linkevolve in the last two decades of the 20th century. The dystopian world of cyberpunk has been called the antithesis of the internal linkutopian science fiction visions of the mid-20th century as typified by the world of Star Trek.

In cyberpunk literature much of the action takes place online, in cyberspace - the clear borderline between the internal linkreal and the internal linkvirtual internal linkbecomes blurred. A typical (though not universal) feature of the genre is a direct connection between the internal linkhuman brain and computer systems.

Cyberpunk's world is a sinister, dark place with internal linknetworked computers that dominate every aspect of life. Giant multinational corporations have replaced governments as centres of power. The internal linkalienated internal linkoutsider's battle against a totalitarian system is a common theme in science fiction; however, in conventional sci-fi those systems tended to be sterile, ordered, and state-controlled. Cyberpunk, in sharp contrast, shows the seamy underbelly of corporatocracy, and the Sisyphean battle against their power by disillusioned renegades.

Cyberpunk stories are seen by social theorists as fictional forecasts of the evolution of the internal linkInternet. The virtual world of the Internet often appears in cyberpunk under various names, including "cyberspace," the "Metaverse" (as seen in internal link_Snow Crash_), and the "Matrix" (from the film internal link_The Matrix_).

Notable precursors to the genre are Alfred Bester (The Stars My Destination (Tiger! Tiger!), 1956), internal linkPhilip K. Dick, John Brunner (The Shockwave Rider, 1975), Vernor Vinge (True Names, 1981), and K. W. Jeter (Dr. Adder, published in the internal link1980s but written ealier.)

At least two role-playing games called Cyberpunk exist: Cyberpunk 2020, by R. Talsorian Games, and GURPS Cyberpunk, published by Steve Jackson Games as a module of the GURPS family of role-playing games. Both are set in the near future, in a world where cybernetics and computers are even more present than today. Corporate corruption is a frequent theme in these games' adventures. The characters often find themselves skirting the law, if not outright flouting it.

In 1990, in an odd re-convergence of cyberpunk art and reality, the U.S. Secret Service somehow came to believe that GURPS Cyberpunk was a "handbook for computer crime", and raided the offices of Steve Jackson Games, confiscating all files related to GURPS Cyberpunk.

An unusual sub-sub-genre of cyberpunk is steampunk, which is set in an anachronistic Victorian environment.

The emerging genre called postcyberpunk continues the preoccupation with the effects of computers, but without the assumption of dystopia or the emphasis on cybernetic implants.



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