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Dragon vortex

Dragons

This nOde last updated April 8th, 2008 and is permanently morphing...
(2 Ik (Wind) / 5 Pohp (Mat) - 2/260 - 12.19.15.4.2)

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dragon

dragon (dràg´en) noun
1.A mythical monster traditionally represented as a gigantic reptile having a lion's claws, the tail of a serpent, wings, and a scaly skin.
2.a. A fiercely vigilant or intractable person. b. Something very formidable or dangerous.
3.Any of various lizards, such as the Komodo dragon or the internal linkflying lizard.
4.Archaic. A large snake or serpent.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin draco, dracon-, large serpent, from Greek drakon, perhaps from derkesthai, to look.]

Dragon

Dragon, legendary reptilian monster with wings, huge claws, and fiery breath. In some folklore the dragon symbolizes destruction and evil. In the sacred writings of the ancient Hebrews, and later in Christianity, the dragon frequently represents death and evil. In certain mythologies, however, such as those of the ancient Greeks and Romans, the dragon possesses powers of good. Partially as a result of the conception of the monster as a benign, protective influence, and partially because of its fearsome qualities, it has been employed as a military emblem by many different cultures over internal linktime.

The dragon also figures in the mythology of various Asian countries. It is deified in internal linkTaoismTao and was the national emblem of the Chinese Empire. It is regarded as a symbol of good fortune in the Chinese tradition.



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Dragons are one of the few symbols that are universally found in all societies. internal linkJungian psychology incorporates the symbol of the dragon into its internal linkarchetype symbolism.

Carl Gustav Jung

The dragon is multidimensional, in fact, dragons have been known to be trans-internal linkdimensional, vibrating from one dimensional plane to another.

In certain mythologies, the dragon is generally credited with beneficent powers. The ancient Greeks and Romans believed that dragons had the ability to understand and convey to mortals the secrets of the earth.  The Roman legions adopted the dragon as the symbol to be carried on its standards into battle by its cohorts.

The folklore of the pagan tribes of northern Europe contained both beneficent and terror-inspiring dragons. In fact, one of the principle episodes of Beowulf deals with the hero killing the dragon.

The ancient Norse men adorned the prows of their ships with the heads of Dragons.  The internal linkceltic tribes and ancient conquerors of Britain considered the dragon a symbol of sovereignty. The dragon was also depicted on
the battle standards and shields of invading Teutonic tribes.

In Western cultures, the dragon was often considered an evil figure; probably a hand-over from its Hebraic-Christian roots, where the dragon was almost continually pictured in such books of the Bible such as Revelations and other apocalyptic literature, as the embodiment of sin.

In Christian art, the dragon is often seen as being crushed under the feet of saints and martyrs, symbolizing the triumph of Christianity over paganism.

In Eastern cultures the dragon is more generously treated. In internal linkTaoistTao traditions the dragon is often deified.  The dragon was the symbol of the Chinese Empire, and among Chinese the dragon is regarded as a symbol of good fortune.

In his book,  _The Dragons of Eden_, internal linkCarl Sagan proposed that one of the reasons that we seem to fear dragons is that our proto-human ancestors retained this fear of reptiles and internal linkdinosaurs in their internal linkDNA make-up.  And this fear has been transmitted from one ancestor to another. Freud and Darwin also spoke of dragons and their impact on our internal linkdream states.



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In both the European and Chinese cultures, the Serpent or Dragon is said to reside somewhere 'below the earth'; it is a powerful internal linkforce, a internal linkmagical force, which is identified with mastery over the created world; it is also a power that can be summoned by the few and not the many. ... The orgone of internal linkWilhelm Reich is just as much Leviathan as is the internal linkKundalini of the Tantric adepts and the power raised by the Witches.  It has always, at least in the past two thousand years, been associated with occultism and essentially with rites of  the forbidden Magic...and the internal linktwisting, sacred spiral formed by the Serpent of the internal linkCaduceus, and by the spinning of the galaxies, is also the same Leviathan as the spiral of the biologists' code of life: internal linkDNA." Virtually every human culture has used the serpentine spiral in its art and religious iconography, coiling into the center and returning upon itself, the return from the labyrinth, the discovery of self, birth and death - the departure from the womb of earth and the return to it.
 

Wilhelm Reich Caduceus DNA


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internal link604 release _Dragon Tales_ 12"x2atomjacked inventory cacheby internal linkKox Box on internal linkBlue Room Released Blue Room Released (1997)
 
Kox Box - Dragon Tales


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Kettle - Dreim on Kracfive (2001) Steve Roach and Byron Metcalf - The Serpent's Lair (2000)
Total Eclipse Lotus Deep Trance and Ritual Beats


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Consciousness and the Subconscious

The human consciousness is really homogeneous. There is no complete forgetting, even in death.
D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse by Frederick Carter," in London internal linkMercury (July 1930; repr. in internal linkPhoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. by E. McDonald, 1936). Carter's book eventually appeared under a different title and without Lawrence's introduction.

Astrology

We need not feel ashamed of flirting with the zodiac. The zodiac is well worth flirting with.
D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse by Frederick Carter," in London Mercury (July 1930; repr. in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. by E. McDonald, 1936). Carter's book eventually appeared under a different title and without Lawrence's introduction. Lawrence's approval of astrology, however, excluded "the rather silly modern way of horoscopy and telling your fortune by the stars." His interest lay in the study of the stars as myth and metaphor.

God

God is only a great imaginative experience.
D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse by Frederick Carter," in London Mercury (July 1930, repr. in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. by E. McDonald, 1936). Carter's book eventually appeared under a different title and without Lawrence's introduction.

Myth

Myth is an attempt to narrate a whole human experience, of which the purpose is too deep, going too deep in the blood and soul, for mental explanation or description.
D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse by Frederick Carter," in London Mercury (July 1930; repr. in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. by E. McDonald, 1936). Carter's book eventually appeared under a different title and without Lawrence's introduction.



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internal link604 entity Double Dragon
 
Double Dragon - Continuum
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