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Silicon Wafer

Silicon
This nOde last updated May 7th, 2003 and is permanently morphing...
(11 K'an (Corn) / 12 Uo - 24/260 - 12.19.10.4.4)

 
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silicon

silicon (sl-ken, -kn) noun Symbol Si
A nonmetallic element occurring extensively in the earth's crust in silica and silicates, having both an amorphous and a crystalline allotrope, and used doped or in combination with other materials in glass, semiconducting devices, concrete, brick, refractories, pottery, and silicones. Atomic number 14; atomic weight 28.086; melting point 1,410C; boiling point 2,355C; specific gravity 2.33; valence 4.

[From silica.]

silicon

silicon (sil'i-kon`) noun
A semiconductor used in many devices, especially microchips. Silicon, with atomic number 14 and atomic weight 28, is the second most common element in nature.

Silicon

Silicon, symbol Si, semimetallic element that is the second most common element on earth, after oxygen. The atomic number of silicon is 14, and the atomic weight is 28.086.

Properties and Occurrence

Silicon forms about 28 percent of the earth's crust, but it does not occur alone. It is found as silicon dioxide and in complex silicates. Nearly 40 percent of all common minerals contain silicon. The mineral internal linkquartz and varieties of quartz (such as onyx and flint) are naturally occurring crystal forms of silica (silicon dioxide). Sand is mostly silicon dioxide. Silicate minerals- pyroxenes, micas, and zeolites-  form most of clays, soils, and rocks. Semiprecious stones, such as garnet, zircon, topaz, and tourmaline, also contain large amounts of silicates.

Uses

Silicon is a semiconductor. Its abundance in nature and the ability to control its internal linkelectrical properties have made possible the development and widespread application of transistors and integrated circuits by the electronics industry. Silicon is also used in the steel industry. Silicon steel, which contains from 2.5 to 4 percent silicon, is used in making the cores of electrical transformers. Silicon is also added to brass and bronze alloys. Silica and silicates are used in the manufacture of glass, glazes, enamels, cement, and porcelain. Sodium silicate, an important synthetic silicate, is a colorless, internal linkwater-soluble solid. The water solution of sodium silicate, called water glass, is used for preserving eggs, for glue in making boxes, and for fireproofing.

Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley (sl-ken vl, -kn)
A region of western California southeast of San Francisco known for its high-technology design and manufacturing industries.

silicon-on-sapphire

silicon-on-sapphire (sil`i-kon-on-saf'r) noun
Acronym SOS.
A method of fabricating semiconductors in which the semiconductor devices are formed in a thin single layer of silicon that has been grown on an insulating substrate of synthetic sapphire.

Science, 1824

Jns Jakob Berzelius isolates silicon.



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"To see a world in a grain of sand..." is a vision of William Blake framed in a sampler on the wall by my bed.  Blake's words offer a poetic summation of the microcosm; worlds inscribed on grains of sand, the silicon chip.  Wrought of sand, oxygen, and aluminum, the three most common substances in the Earth's crust, the microprocessor distills ideas as a complex as a street map of America onto a sliver of silicon the size of a thumbnail.  This gift of the internal linkquantum is a miracle of internal linkcompression.  The gift of the telecosm is a miracle of expansion: grains of sand internal linkspun into crystalline fibers and woven into worldwide webs.

- George Gilder - _Telecosm_



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I have had a thought about this recently which I will tell you. One of the internal linkscience fiction fantasies that haunts the internal linkcollective unconscious is expressed in the phrase "a world run by machines"; in the 1950s this was first articulated in the notion, "perhaps the future will be a terrible place where the world is run by machines." Well now, let's think about machines for a moment. They are extremely impartial, very predictable, not subject to moral suasion, value neutral, and very long lived in their functioning. Now let's think about what machines are made of, in the internal linklight of internal linkSheldrake's   morphogenetic field theory. Machines are made of metal, glass, gold, silicon, plastic; they are made of what the earth is made of.  Now wouldn't it be strange if biology is a way for earth to internal linkalchemically transform itself into a self-reflecting thing. In which case then, what we're headed for inevitably, what we are in fact creating is a world run by machines. And once these machines are in place, they can be expected to manage our economies, internal linklanguages, social aspirations, and so forth, in such a way that we stop killing each other, stop starving each other, stop destroying land, and so forth. Actually the fear of being ruled by machines is the male ego's fear of relinquishing control of the planet to the maternal internal linkmatrix of internal linkGaia. - internal linkTerence McKenna
 
 
Alchemy Mother Gaia Terence McKenna - the force will be with you...always



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